Asus T100TA Transformerbook (a LiB thread)

Discussion in 'tech' started by Lain, 18 Jul 2015.

  1. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    Yes, it makes sense. I've gotten lazy over the last year and have started using too many automated tools.

    Time to break out the command line reference for a refresh and dump the gui tools. ;)
     
  2. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    i dont think this matters, but it may, so if you are doing it, it might be a good idea to format the usb/sd first. it *shouldn't* matter, but then again it might. i did it to be safe the first time because i was so sick of shit NOT working i just piled into the command line because that is where it excels in the first place
     
  3. nina

    nina still prettier than you
    Nerdy

    just testing something
     
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  4. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    Story of my life.
     
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  5. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    Ok so last night I wandered off and then passed out next to Bunnie and never got around to making the image.

    I plan to do that today and then tonight after the day winds down I'm going to give it another go. If I can get the little fucker to boot to something other than Windows, I might have found solutions for the most common Linux issues plaguing this little thing. And I think Debian proper might be a bit better than UBU but still doing some reading.
     
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  6. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    might?

    Debian > ubuntu
     
  7. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    Yes, dear, I understand that. As I explained I have gotten Lazy and the thought of a ground up Debian build sounds both appealing and like an excruciating amount of work at the same time. Ubuntu has the polished touchscreen interface all ready to go OOB.

    My choice to go with Debian is mostly based on the amount of work I already know I have to do to get the machine running Linux properly, so I might as well just build the damn thing from the ground up. And since Ubuntu is a derivative of Debian, it only makes sense to use the Debian repos.

    I've seen people have more luck with Debian as well, there's precompiled packages popping up randomly (not that I recommend that). I'm going to order a USB wifi dongle with a Realtek chipset in it for practical purposes, as Kita mentioned those seem to be almost 100% compatible with most Linux builds, so at the very least I will have network access for fetching and compiling.

    My overall strategy at this stage is to get a Live distro to boot, then image the SSD to a mobile HDD and do a complete wipe of the SSD and a fresh base install of Debian, then I can go from there. As long as the basics work, input, output, network..... I can fetch the rest and compile it from the network.

    The biggest problems are audio issues (which might be remedied by the bleeding edge driver), wireless issues (welcome to the world of broadcom chipsets, nothing new here), some people are having problems with sleep/hibernation. It is my understanding that if I can update the kernel to the newest one it resolves the data loss issue.

    It's like the late 90s all over again. :D
     
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  8. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    Before the question is asked, the SSD is simply too small for a dual boot where a Windows installation is one of the OSes in question. Windows takes too much space once I've set it up the way I like it.

    I guess I could do a 10/10/30 break down where 10 is Linux 10 is Windows and 30 for storage. I bet Windows needs at least 15 to breathe. So Maybe it's better to do a 10/40 and just use the Windows partition for storage (which is accessible from Linux as well).

    I can pick up 8gb if I blow out the restore partition, I thought about running Debian in a VM but that sounds like a waste of resources and a good path to total frustration.
     
  9. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    So, I have discovered that both my Ubuntu image and my Debian image are not UEFI 32bit compatible, and that is the issue I am having.

    So, I am going to download the correct image files later tonight, and start from scratch. I guess I just assumed the primary download would provide me with the most up to date and least problematic solution.
     
  10. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    Browsing the Debian site doesn't clear up the issue. I have the following image already...

    debian-live-8.1.0-i386-gnome-desktop.iso

    And I do not see any images referencing UEFI. I had originally assumed the image was UEFI by default, and that the i386-gnome version was for 32 bit machines, which I need to even attempt a dual boot with the 32bit Windows that is installed, I believe.
     
  11. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    get the net install and dl your desktop during install.

    and remember to back up your recovery drive as it has your windows license info
     
  12. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    wait, why are you using 32 bits? does the hardware not support 64?

    remember multiarch works well
     
  13. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    rereading, i know of no reason other than hardware that a 32 bit windows would effect a 64 bit linux install

    grub takes over the bootloading from uefi, if i remember correctly, so there should be no issues there as it is grub that actually initiates the OS

    and i still strongly recommend going to windows 10 1st in the instructions i have provided, or you will be stuck and not be able to get a non microsoft admin account as windows (normally) nukes the entire drive on a fresh install. dual boot devices ALWAYS needs to have windows in 1st, unless something has changed
     
  14. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    ok, re-re-reading it seems you are stuck with 32 until at least grub is installed

    maybe drop a command line only 32 bit on there(no desktop), then install a 64 bit full OS from grub, then nuke the 32 bit install

    unless you are out of primary partitions, that seems like it might be a workaround. might require testing
     
  15. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

    maybe just put grub on 1st prior to install. i know that is backwards, but hey, linux is flexible

    http://sourceforge.net/projects/grub2win/

    it does seem to alter the efi files, so that may keep you in 32 bit space if so
     
  16. Mulch

    Mulch Why does the drum come hither?
    Psychedelic

  17. Kita

    Kita Should Update Title

    Call me crazy (cause I know I already am)... but what about a network boot of Windows, and use your tablet as a terminal to access it? Just to complicate this build further, but could be fun to fart with! If you have a home server with a fast connection, it should work. At the very least, with a network boot, Windows should be easily under 10GB on the Tablet, and a terminal version will be pre stripped down for you. You don't always need a connection to the server to do basic stuff, but it will want to fetch all storage from there and run many programs from there, obviously. It will want to phone home to log in too, but I am sure that can be hacked a bit. And I am sure you can tweak it to point some of that stuff back to the tablet to eliminate most network functions. Might help with security too, but I haven't played with terminal versions of Windows so I am unsure.

    Let me poke around and see if people have been successful with this on a tablet.
     
  18. Lain

    Lain End of line. #resist
    Sneaky

    That's an interesting proposition. Sort of like the old Citrix installations.
     
  19. Kita

    Kita Should Update Title

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.microsoft.rdc.android&hl=en

    Well, that is a promising sign indeed. It is an official Microsoft App, so it should work very well.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't look like Windows makes host versions of Windows. They leave that to the Thin Client manufacturers still. I thought they had full solution configurations to couple with their server and management stuff. I haven't worked with virtualization and network boot yet, so I am really not up to date as to the options available there.


    hmmm....


    However, Microsoft makes virtualization as compatible as they possibly can with any implementation you could want. It looks like a good option will be to stick Android back on it as the host, and virtualize Windows. That app will give you Hyper-V capabilities so you can do that. You can also stick something super light in the bootloader, like Puppy, and Virtualize through there so you have as many resources available as possible. I am not sure how well Linux will virtualize Windows, you probably have more knowledge there than me. You could hax0rs some Citrix or Wyse host software, but that would probably be way more work than needed without any better results.

    Well, I guess I should have asked if the Tablet has PXE native in the BIOS for the network boot options. That is the easiest way to make it happen. If not, it will be a little weird. If you have some form of it on your USB stick, try that. I don't know too much about the process since I haven't worked with any of this before, but it should toss you into Windows PE, which is super light. It is the installation environment. Maybe that is the host that will get installed on that Tablet? If it is, it is super small. Small enough to stuff on a single DVD. This is new territory for me, but there are many completely Microsoft sanctioned ways to get Windows without stuffing the whole install on the system.

    Wikis are relevant. I need to learn this shit too, it is a glaring hole in my knowledge/ skillset that I really need in order to get into enterprise and work with the big kids.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Deployment_Services
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface#Network_booting

    Looks like Windows PE is the host. It is super light and small and should provide all you need to network boot into a remote server hosting Windows. It is lighter than I thought, however, so it will be very dependent on the server. It will load the GUI and everything needed for that to function, but that is it. The server plays a huge role here.

    Virtualization may be better than a network boot if getting a reliable server connection will be a problem. It really is meant for use on internal gigabit networks, not for roaming access like virtualization. I am learning more about this stuff as I look into it! :p

    Also, if you know about diskless or dataless systems, those are an option too. My brain is now completely lost on how to go about those in this scenario, since I know so little about network boots and virtualization to begin with.



    I looked into some more familiar territory on how to simply just manually shave Windows 10 down. Apparently, the main way to make this happen is through something called "Wimboot". http://blogs.windows.com/itpro/2014/04/10/what-is-windows-image-boot-wimboot/ It was introduced in 8.1, and has been fully integrated in 10. It normally is implemented by the device manufacturer, but you can make your own WIMboot image of Windows. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn621983.aspx An article I read says it will take it down to 4GB!! It obviously was meant for phones more than anything. I am finding conflicting information from Microsoft and users about WIMboot integration in Windows 10 too. Some are saying you don't need to go through this process, as there is an option to compress it during installation of 10. Was there an option for this?? If so, go with that. If not, you will need to go through the song and dance in the article to make a proper image.

    Please note that Microsoft does NOT want you doing this unless you have to. They are saying it will slow things down. How much? Idk. Try it. See how it runs.
     
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  20. Kita

    Kita Should Update Title

    Huh, apparently, a few companies are working on this very problem right now; getting mobile devices to replace Windows desktops and laptops for enterprise use. They are working on USB stick sized Thin Clients that can be plugged right into a monitor as well. Citrix has a really nice set of solutions called "Xen" that bring all kinds of desktop functionality to mobile devices, including ability to access Microsoft apps and programs as well as very good remote desktop access. Administration options too for administrating security and permissions for mobile and BYOD. It is all cloud-hosted on the businesses' servers too, so it is a bit of a hybrid of remote desktop/ network boot/ virtualization. A small app on the device, and the muscle is in the server.

    Not exactly an option in this case since it is enterprise... but it is in the pipes and coming down.
     
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